Part Four – TRAUMATIC INJURY IMAGE CONSUMPTION

*I ALSO WOULD LIKE TO DISCLOSE THAT I WILL NOT BE INCLUDING MANY, IF AT ALL, OF THE TRAUMATIC IMAGES I AM RESEARCHING DUE TO THEIR POTENTIALLY TRIGGERING NATURE. TO SEARCH FOR IMAGES OF THE LIKES, START WITH @TRAUMA_TIME ON INSTAGRAM AND YOU ARE SURE TO FIND YOURSELF DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE.*

Congratulations if you have made it this far! You have reached Part Four of this series on traumatic image consumption on social media. If you have stumbled upon this, make sure you brush up on Parts 1, 2, and 3 first so that we can get right to these conclusions.

It is clear there are many facets of this large online market for consuming traumatic images, and many considerations to take if the platform is to gain the attention it demands. While it can be considered an educational tool, I fear the appropriateness of Instagram as a platform is not suitable for credible learning experiences. If applications such as Figure 1 are to be adopted, the prevention of marketing exploitation is also achieved. However, this also restricts the given potential for an online behaviour to develop, similarly to the online giant memes have become today, especially considering the vast range of motivations observed for the consumption of such images.

Why is this an issue for communications and media? As a communications student, this may very well be a marketplace we will become a part of, and in order to effectively develop such an unusual behaviour, we must first understand it. We should strive to get educated, especially for newly-emerging industries such as our own.

I hope you have enjoyed this mini-series, and I would love to continue the conversation. Leave a comment below, or reach out with your thoughts!

 

Many thanks,

Claudia

 

Word Count: 240

Full References List

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  • Campbell, D. (2006). Horrific Blindness: Images of Death in Contemporary Media. Journal for Cultural Research, 8(1), pp.55-74.
  • Dallas, G., (2013) Business Ethics in emerging markets and investors expectation standards. Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation, pp. 4-7
  • Kaplan, E. (2008). Global trauma and public feelings: Viewing images of catastrophe. Consumption Markets & Culture, 11(1), pp.3-24.
  • Miller, I., Cupchik, G. (2014) Meme creation and sharing processes: individuals shaping the masses. Toronto: University of Toronto, pp. 1-2
  • Muller, C. (2018). Research Proposal BCM312 Traumatic Injury Image Consumption. Sydney, pp. 1.
  • Patel, N., Puri, N. (2017) The complete guide to understanding consumer psychology. Quicksprout, pp. Chpt 3
  • Tooth, R. (2014). Graphic content: when photographs of carnage are too upsetting to publish. The Guardian. [online] < https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jul/23/graphic-content-photographs-too-upsetting-to-publish-gaza-mh17-ukraine >
  • Vena, J. (2015) Instagram clarifies its no nipple policy. Los Angeles: Billboard. [online] < https://www.billboard.com/articles/news/6538630/instagram-nipple-policy > 
  • Yvette Wohn, D., Fiesler, C., Hemphill, L., De Choudhury, M. and Nathan Matias, J. (2017). How to Handle Online Risks?: Discussing Content Curation and Moderation in Social Media. Human Factors in Computing Systems. [online] < https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3051141 >
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